VALERIE JAUDON

STATIONS AND STATES

CHUCK WEBSTER

LANDS AND CASTLES

APRIL 7 - may 20, 2017


Valerie Jaudon, Motet, 2016, 42 x 42 inches, oil on linen 

Valerie Jaudon, Motet, 2016, 42 x 42 inches, oil on linen 


Chuck Webster, Untitled (Lands and Castles), 2017, Shellac ink, pencil and ink on antique handmade paper,                            13 1/4 x 11 1/2 inches

Chuck Webster, Untitled (Lands and Castles), 2017, Shellac ink, pencil and ink on antique handmade paper,                            13 1/4 x 11 1/2 inches


During the course of Valerie Jaudon's distinguished forty-year career, she has been committed to redefining the parameters of abstraction. A member of the original Pattern and Decoration group, she is a representative of important tendencies of the larger Postminimalist movement.

Jaudon was the driving force behind the influential 1991 Sidney Janis Gallery exhibition, Conceptual Abstraction (reprised and expanded in 2012 in an exhibition in the Hunter College Times Square Galleries), which featured among others, Stephen Ellis, Jonathan Lasker, Thomas Nozkowski, David Row and John Zinsser. 

Jaudon is the recipient of numerous awards and grants; her work has been collected by and exhibited in major museums. Among them are The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; National Gallery, Washington DC; Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; McNay Art Museum, San Antonio; St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Städel Museum, Frankfurt, Germany; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaeck, Denmark; Suermondt-Ludwig Museum, Aachen, Germany.

Jaudon has also completed a number of highly regarded public projects. Of particular note are works at The Birmingham Museum of Art, Alabama; Städel Museum, Frankfurt; Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse, St. Louis, Missouri; The Wainwright Building, St. Louis; Reagan National Airport, Washington DC; Manhattan Municipal Building, New York; and MTA Lexington Avenue Subway, 23rd Street, New York.

Chuck Webster can best be characterized as a visionary painter. His visual vocabulary is highly personal. Drawn from his imagination and from the world, the shapes in his Lands and Castles drawings are oddly recognizable yet are built from the abstract formulations so often seen in his work. 

The artist’s work can be seen in numerous public collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; the Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX; and The Beinecke Library at Yale University, New Haven, CT.