Upcoming Exhibitions

Other Ways; Other Times 
Influences of African-American Tradition from St. Louis Collections

Opening Reception Friday, October 24, 2014 6-8 pm  - runs through November 22, 2014


Kehinde Wiley, After Titian's (Tiziano Vecellio) Penitent Mary Magdalene, 2009, oil wash on paper, 90 x 60 inches,  Courtesy of Susan and David Sherman

Kehinde Wiley, After Titian's (Tiziano Vecellio) Penitent Mary Magdalene, 2009, oil wash on paper, 90 x 60 inches, 
Courtesy of Susan and David Sherman

The Philip Slein Gallery, in partnership with St. Louis collectors and Susan Barrett of Barrett Barrera, will present an exhibition highlighting the influences of African-American tradition culled from numerous private collections. The exhibition, “Other Ways; Other Times: Influences of African-American Tradition from St. Louis Collections” features works by Radcliffe Bailey, Jean Michel Basquiat, Dawoud Bey, Ellen Gallagher, Glenn Ligon, Kara Walker, Kehinde Wiley, and others.

“This exhibition is not so much about defining a culture as it is about attempting to portray its multifaceted aspects and profound contributions,” says gallery co-owner Philip Slein. “From the realism of Beauford Delaney and the Harlem Renaissance to the conceptual issues of Rashid Johnson and Lorna Simpson; from the freewheeling folk art of Mose Tolliver to the sophisticated introspection of Kara Walker and Glenn Ligon – a great tradition is worked and reworked, inspiring current and future generations of African-American artists as well as those from other cultures.”

“We have a rich tradition of collecting artworks by African-American artists in St. Louis,” says art and fashion consultant Susan Barrett. “African-American art has never been mono-thematic and this exhibition is designed to portray its diversity, as well as to honor local collectors who are preserving its rich history.”

Dawoud Bey, Kenneth, 2001, chromogenic print, 23.5 x 19.5 inches, Courtesy of Private Collection

Dawoud Bey, Kenneth, 2001, chromogenic print, 23.5 x 19.5 inches,
Courtesy of Private Collection